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Neighborhood Spotlight: Tucson Country Club

Tucson Country Club Estates

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Tucson Country Club Estates is a beautiful golf community on Tucson’s northeast side. The fantastic location is convenient to all of Tucson’s amenities yet retains a tranquil feel. The large view lots, towering trees, and luxury homes provide Tucson living at its finest. Homes and lots in this neighborhood are typically quite spacious.

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Tucson Country Club

The club provides a 44,000 SF facility featuring old world style architecture and historic Tucson elements, 18-hole golf course designed by acclaimed father and son designers William F., and William P. Bell, aquatic center with an 8-lane saltwater lap pool, 97-foot water slide, wading pool, splash pad, five lighted championship tennis courses, pickle ball, and fine dining.

A brief history of Tucson Country Club

Charles H. Boyles owned the 1,300-acre ranch in 1935. He rented the ranch to the first Mormon community in Tucson. The ranch was used as a truck farm and dairy.
In 1935 Boyles sold 580 acres to Lenore Moore for $12,000. Her Brother built two ranch houses named Rancho de la Sombre. Unfortunately, the project failed.
In 1945 the property changed hands again, this time to Carl and Marie Reininger. In 1946 fifty prominent Tucsonans were disappointed with the El Rio Golf Course on Tucson’s West side and decided to create a golf resort that took advantage of the beautiful East side location. They formed a for profit corporation called Country Club Estates Inc.


If you would like information on buying or selling a home in Tucson Country Club Estates please contact Nick Labriola at 520-975-8956. You may also subscribe to my mobile app on your smart device by visiting: longrealtyapp.com/nicklabriola

Sign up to receive daily email updates on homes as they go on the market.

 

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Aldea Linda Neighborhood

Located north of 22nd St and west of Swan Rd., Tucson AZ 85711
Developed 1947 to 1964  |  Received Historic District status in 2009

If you are looking for a quiet, rural feeling neighborhood located in midtown Tucson that is close to shopping and amenities, look no further than Aldea Linda!

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Aldea Linda means beautiful small village, with homes situated on one main road, Calle Jabali (translates to Wild Boar Street ). The neighborhood is defined by larger 2.5 – 4.8 acre parcels with great setbacks. Many properties have semicircular drives made of gravel. The natural vegetation of mesquite and creosote affords more privacy, and a quiet rural feel. The combination of these factors is a major contributor to the historic status of the neighborhood.

The seventy-five acre development was originally platted in 1947 by Samuel P. Goddard Jr. and Julia “Judy” Goddard. Samuel would later become governor of Arizona. Their son Terry Goddard served as the United States Attorney General.

The original subdivision consisted of eighteen buildings and included an art school and a church. Categories of homes are Late 19th and 20th century revivals, Spanish Colonial Revival, Modern Movement Ranch, Modern Sonoran, and Neo Eclectic. There are fourteen buildings that contribute to the historic designation, and four noncontributing buildings.

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The materials used in the homes are brick, burnt adobe, asphalt shingle, concrete tile, mission tile or wood shake roofs.

Several noteworthy architects designed homes in the area, including: Josias Joesler, Emerson C. Schoeler, Builder Tom Gist, Rodrigo J. Gomez, Jerry Robinson, and T. Roger Blyth. Emerson C. Shoeler is credited with the art studio building.

Due to the neighborhoods smaller size, homes are not for sale as often.

If you would like information on buying or selling a home in Aldea Linda please contact Nick Labriola at 520-975-8956. You may also subscribe to my mobile app on your smart device by visiting: longrealtyapp.com/nicklabriola

Sign up to receive daily email updates on homes as they go on the market.

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Tucson-university of arizona-area-map-

Thinking about buying a home near the University of Arizona?

I help many families each year buy and sell homes near the University of Arizona. Sometimes I’m working with families of new undergrad students, sometimes for grad students, sometimes for university staff looking for a home close to their employer, and often times for folks looking to live closer to the amenities that the university/downtown Tucson area offers. As a UA alumnus, I have first-hand knowledge of the campus and areas around the university.

This guide is to help assist you in finding a great UA area home that fits your needs. I have included many links to searches with different criteria that I hope will cater to what you’re interested in. Please don’t hesitate to call, text, or email me (Nick 520-975-8956 or Nick@RealTucson.com) with any questions on any home in the Tucson area. I’m here to help you. I’ll also create a custom search with the criteria that matters most to you, emailed to you when homes matching your requirements come on the market.

Let’s get started…

university of arizona mall

Shopping districts near University of Arizona:

  • Campbell Avenue: between Grant Road and Fort Lowell Road
    • Albertson’s grocery
    • lots of restaurants
    • banks/services
    • lots of shops
  • Sunshine Mile: on Broadway east of Campbell Avenue
    • Safeway at Broadway and Campbell
    • banks/ services
    • restaurants
  • Main Gate: just west of the school on University Blvd
    • CVS pharmacy
    • restaurants
    • shops
  • 4th Avenue: between University Blvd and 9th Street
    • Food Conspiracy Co-op
    • lots of restaurants
    • lots of shops
  • Downtown Tucson
    • Johnny Gibson’s Downtown Market
    • lots of restaurants
    • shops/banks
  • 6th Street and Tucson Boulevard
    • Rincon Market
    • restaurants

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How to get around Tucson and University of Arizona area – helpful links:

Other frequently asked questions:

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Are you interested in buying or selling a University of Arizona area home in Tucson? Contact Nick at 520-975-8956 or Nick@RealTucson.com

Sign up to receive daily email updates on homes as they go on the market. Download the new Long Realty app now:  iPad iPhone Android Or visit: longrealtyapp.com/nicklabriola from any mobile device.

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Mid century homes for sale in Tucson

Tucson experienced a housing boom after WWII, which means we enjoy a lot of great mid-century architecture.

Tucson grew leaps and bounds in the post war years of the 1950s and 1960s. As a result mid-century architecture is ubiquitous here. Mid-century Modern architecture has become more popular with a younger generation looking for clean lines and interesting details that are often not found in standard track homes built today. Many enjoy these homes because they are in established neighborhoods, which tend to be more centrally located and feature plenty of mature trees. Are you looking for a mid-century home in Tucson? Let this page be your guide.

Midcentury Homes currently for Sale Midcentury Condos & Townhomes for Sale
Under $100,000 Under $50,000
$100,001 – $200,000 $50,001 – $100,000
$200,001 – $300,000 $100,001 – $200,000
$300,001 – $400,000 $200,001 – $300,000
$400,001 and up $300,001 and up

 

Tucson Mid Century homes for sale

Who were some of the movers and shakers (i.e. builders, architects, designers) of Tucson’s mid-century homes?

  • Builders/Developers:
    • Lusk Corporation
    • J. Herbert Oxman
    • P.A.T. (Perfect Arizona Type) Homes
    • MRF Construction
    • Busby-Carroll Construction Co.
    • Beauty Built Homes
    • Chesin Construction
    • Morrison-Fremming
    • Daly Construction Co.
    • Miller Construction Co.
    • Cheuvront Homes
    • Associated Home Builder
    • Algin Construction
  • Architects/designers:

Where are some of the Tucson mid-century neighborhoods?

Let’s not leave out Tucson mid-century condo and townhouse communities:

Green Hills advertisement from 1958

What features might I find in a mid century house?

Mid-century homes were built between 1945-1975. This is a broad time period so there were a lot of different styles that were popular over the years. Ranch style homes are ubiquitous during this time period. Ranch homes could veer towards the more modern range of the spectrum or toward the more traditional side. Just as styles of furnishings during this time ranged from Colonial to Danish to Mediterranean to Modern, houses, too, followed these same style trends. Here’s some of the things you may find in a Tucson mid century home.

  • Burnt adobe construction
  • Red brick
  • Wire-cut brick
  • Large windows that follow the roof line
  • Clerestory windows
  • Knotty pine cabinetry/paneling/woodwork
  • Colorful plumbing fixtures and appliances
  • Colorful tile  in the kitchen and bath
  • Formica countertops
  • Linoleum floors
  • Terrazzo floors
  • Mahogany interior doors
  • Single or double carports
  • flagstone or brick fireplaces
  • Colorful kitchen appliances
  • Phone nook
  • Breeze blocks
  • Wrought iron details
  • Decorative shutters

Midcentury home advertisement

Are you interested in buying or selling a Mid Century home in Tucson? Contact Nick at 520-975-8956 or Nick@RealTucson.com

Sign up to receive daily email updates on homes as they go on the market. Download the new Long Realty app now:  iPad iPhone Android Or visit: longrealtyapp.com/nicklabriola from any mobile device.

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Homes for sale near Downtown Tucson

View of the east end of Downtown TucsonDowntown Tucson is currently experiencing an exciting renaissance. It all started with the renovation of the Fox Theater in 2005 and continued with the opening of the Tucson Modern Streetcar in 2014, which prompted many businesses, restaurants, and people to move downtown.

Now is a great time to live a more urban life in the heart of Tucson. With so many great new restaurants, bars, breweries, shops, museums, and events; Downtown Tucson is the place to live, work, and play in Tucson. You could be part of the downtown Tucson revolution.

Radius Searches for Downtown Tucson: (links are updated continually)

Single Family Houses for Sale Condos / Townhouses for Sale
Within 1/2 mile radius Within 1/2 mile radius
Within 1 mile radius Within 1 mile radius
Within 2 mile radius Within 2 mile radius
Within 3 mile radius Within 3 mile radius
Within 4 mile radius   Within 4 mile radius

Or search homes for sale by price, within 2 mile radius of Downtown Tucson:

Historic Pima County courthouse located in Downtown Tucson, designed by Roy Place

There’s so many places to visit downtown including:

Search for homes near Downtown Tucson

example of historic house in Downtown Tucson

Danny Martin's work being exhibited at Tucson Museum of Art

Houses for sale near downtown Tucson

What are others saying about Tucson?

  • The New York Times called Tucson an Unsung Architectural Oasis June 12, 2015
  • Outside Magazine called Tucson “America’s Hottest Playground” in 2011
  • Forbes Magazine named Tucson as one of “The Most Innovative Cities” in 2010
  • Sunset Magazine called Tucson one of “The Most Innovative Cities of the West”
  • Travel + Leisure named Tucson as one of “The Most Underrated Cities” in 2011
  • SFGate wrote an article called “Hip Little Tucson Heats Up” May 5, 2013
  • Money Magazine rated Tucson #4 for “Best Cities for Millennials” Sept. 25, 2015

Search homes for sale near downtown tucson

Many Historic Districts are in the Downtown Tucson area including:

  • El Presidio
  • Armory Park
  • West University
  • Iron Horse
  • Pie Allen
  • Rincon Heights
  • Feldman’s
  • Barrio Anita
  • Barrio Santa Rosa
  • Barrio El Membrillo
  • Barrio El Hoyo
  • Barrio Libre
  • Dunbar Spring / John Spring
  • Menlo Park

Are you interested in living in Downtown Tucson? Or would you like to sell your Tucson property? Contact Nick at 520-975-8956 or Nick@RealTucson.com

Sign up to receive daily email updates on homes as they go on the market.

Or download the new Long Realty app now:  iPad iPhone Android

Or visit: longrealtyapp.com/nicklabriola from any mobile device

  • Current and Accurate – Information updated every 15 minutes from the MLS
  • Find nearby properties
  • Draw your own search area
  • Track favorite listings
  • Large, high resolution property photos
  • HomeScan – Scan the neighborhood for homes using a live camera view
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Did you know Tucson has 35 Historic Districts on the National Register?

Below is an alphabetical list of each of Tucson’s Historic Districts and what makes each area unique with links to homes currently for sale in each district.

Homes for sale in Aldea Linda Historic District in Tucson

Aldea Linda – This Tucson neighborhood, located near 22nd Street and Swan, is one of the smallest historic districts in town with only about 15 homes located on a single street: Calle Jabali (which translates to Wild Boar Street). Aldea Linda is Spanish for ‘beautiful little village’. Homes in this neighborhood were built between 1947-1964 and are rarely for sale, since there are so few. Sam P. Goddard Jr. (former Arizona Governor) and his wife Julia “Judy” Hatch Goddard built their home here in 1947, then had the rest of the land subdivided. Terry Goddard was their oldest son who was recently Arizona Attorney General. The neighborhood had tight deed restrictions which caused the houses to be set far back from the street on large lots (2.5 – 4.8 acres). The neighborhood retains much of it’s original native creosote vegetation. Aldea Linda became a historic district in 2009. Search for homes for sale in Aldea Linda neighborhood

Armory Park neighborhood in TucsonArmory Park is a historic Tucson neighborhood conveniently located south of the booming downtown area, between Broadway and 18th Street and between Stone and 3rd Avenue. The neighborhood was so named because the area was a military plaza and an armory from 1862 to 1873, prior to moving  to Fort Lowell, northeast of Tucson. Armory Park was settled by many railroad workers after the Southern Pacific arrived in Tucson in 1880. The neighborhood is defined by wide streets with architectural styles ranging from Victorian to simpler Sonoran-style adobe row houses. Lush, mature trees, close proximity to amenities such as downtown shops, restaurants, arts, and entertainment, all continue to make this neighborhood popular. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. Click here to read more about Armory Park   Click here to Search for homes in Armory Park neighborhood

Barrio Anita neighborhood homes for sale

Barrio Anita – The land that Barrio Anita sits on was purchased by Thomas Hughes, a prominent businessman, who was the lesser known brother of Sam Hughes. Hughes named the streets after his friends and his sister Annie, which quickly became known as Anita. Situated between I-10 and Granada, between Speedway and St. Mary’s Road, this small neighborhood was mostly built out by the 1920s. After WWII many structures were torn down and quite a few homes in Barrio Anita were constructed more recently. The historic homes located here were built in many different styles such as: Sonoran, Queen Anne, Bungalow, Mission Revival but were usually constructed out of adobe. Search homes for sale in Barrio Anita

Homes for sale in Historic Barrio El Hoyo neighborhood Tucson

Barrio El Hoyo, Barrio Membrillo, and Barrio Libre comprise the neighborhood that may be better known among locals as Barrio Viejo or Barrio Historico. Located just southwest of Tucson’s bustling downtown area, these 3 neighborhoods have a surprisingly slower paced feel, due in part to the narrow roads. El Hoyo translates to ‘the hole’ because of the area’s topography. Until the 1880s the land was cultivated farm land with close proximity to the once flowing Santa Cruz River. Leopoldo Carrillo purchased the land where he grew many types of fruit trees, known as Carrillo Gardens, which also had spring fed lakes. Emanuel Drachman purchased the land in 1903, which he developed and renamed Elysian Grove, an amusement park with a baseball diamond and theater in 1910. In 1912 it was visited by Teddy Roosevelt. Elysian Grove shut down in 1915 due to financial problems. The land was sold and subdivided. Part of this land became Carrillo School, built in 1930, designed by Merritt Starkweather, a prominent architect who also designed The Arizona Inn. Barrio El Hoyo was mostly built out by 1931. The homes were built in Sonoran Transitional style, which blended traditional Sonoran with non-Hispanic elements. Search homes for sale in Barrio El Hoyo

Homes for sale in Barrio El Membrillo historic district Tucson

Barrio El Membrillo -Named for the quince trees that grew in this area, this small neighborhood of only 13 buildings was once much larger, but became victim to the interstate Highway System with the construction of I-10 in the 1950s and ‘urban renewal’ in the 1960s. The highway construction eliminated half the structures here and the development of the Tucson Convention Center leveled many more homes in the 1960s. The neighborhood consists of Sonoran architecture built primarily of adobe. Search homes for sale in Barrio El Membrillo

Homes for sale in historic Barrio Libre, Barrio Viejo, Tucson

Barrio Libre – This historic district sits just east of Barrio El Hoyo and south of Tucson’s downtown area. Barrio Libre is the largest portion of Barrio Viejo area.  This neighborhood was built between 1860s and 1920s and was known as Barrio Libre (Free District) because it was out of the city’s jurisdiction. Among the first residents were a few business people and other professionals, but most were laborers. Most of the older buildings were Sonoran row houses built of adobe. Structures built a little later were typically non-Hispanic style homes in the Victorian, Queen Anne, or American Traditional styles. Search homes for sale in Barrio Libre

Homes for sale in Barrio El Membrillo historic district Tucson

Barrio Santa Rosa – Close to downtown Tucson, this neighborhood is roughly bounded by 18th Street and 22nd Street to the north and south, 6th Avenue and Meyer to the east and west. This area’s architecture consists of Sonoran Row Houses, Post-war Territorial, Ranch, Queen Anne, Bungalow, Craftsman, Spanish Revival, and Mission Revival. This neighborhood was listed in the National Register of Historic Districts in 2011. Sunset Magazine featured some of the new construction projects in the neighborhood. Search homes for sale in Barrio Santa Rosa

Homes for sale in historic Blenman Elm neighborhood, Tucson

Blenman-Elm This popular neighborhood in midtown Tucson offers diverse architectural styles in a convenient urban setting. Located just east of the University Medical Center, the “L” shaped neighborhood covers approximately one square mile and is bordered by Grant Road on the north, Speedway on the south, Country Club on the east and Campbell on the west. Development dates back to 1900 when developer Andrew Olsen built a home at the NE corner of Helen Street and Plumer Avenue. Growth was slow until a boom occurred in 1936. Peak growth was in 1955. By 1960 the area was mostly built-out. Twenty-one of the homes were designed by architect Josias Joesler. Historical Landmarks include; Arizona Inn(1930), Peter and Paul Catholic Church (1931) and Blenman Elementary School (1942). The district was designated to the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. Click here to read more about Blenman-Elm neighborhood. Search homes for sale in Blenman-Elm

Homes for sale in historic Catalina Vista neighborhood Tucson

Catalina Vista – Bordered by Grant and Elm to the north and south and Campbell and Tucson Blvd. to the west and east, this neighborhood forms the missing square from Blenman-Elm L-shaped border. This quaint midtown neighborhood has a lot to offer with it’s curvilinear roads encircling a central grassy park lined with towering palm trees. A second neighborhood park features a children’s playground. Margaret Sanger Slee, probably the most well known Catalina Vista resident, had Tucson architect Arthur Brown design a home for her, after trying to hire Frank Lloyd Wright, who scoffed at the idea of building on a small city lot. Catalina Vista was listed on the National Register of Historic Districts in 2003. This neighborhood is just north of the renowned Arizona Inn, which was founded by Arizona’s first female congresswoman, Isabella Greenway. Click here to read more about Catalina Vista.  Search homes for sale in Catalina Vista

Homes for Sale in Colonia Solana Tucson

Colonia Solana – Colonia Solana is the first Tucson neighborhood to embrace the natural desert landscape surrounding it. Located just southeast of Broadway and Country Club, this neighborhood has 123 homes on large lots. Most are Spanish Colonial Revival or Ranch style homes. Landscape Architect Steven Child of San Francisco worked on the design of the neighborhood. He had a talent for incorporating the existing topography along with native plants to create a natural landscape that highlighted the Arroyo Chico, which runs within the property. Child’s design featured an informal, non-symmetrical, curvilinear layout, in contrast to the more formal El Encanto neighborhood just to the north, which was developed in the same time period. Most homes were built between 1928 and 1960. Many of the homes were designed by such notable architects as: Roy Place, Josias Joesler, Arthur Brown, Tom Gist, Ann Rysdale, and Merrit Starkweather. The neighborhood also is home to a 65-foot tall stucco-covered water tower designed by Roy Place in 1929 to provide water to the area. The neighborhood hugs Reid Park, Tucson’s largest park, which features a popular jogging path around the perimeter, as well as a golf course and driving range, a zoo, tennis facilities, Hi-Corbett baseball stadium, and an outdoor amphitheater. Click here to read more about Colonia Solana. Search homes for sale in Colonia Solana neighborhood

dunbar springs neighborhood homes for sale

Dunbar Spring/John Spring – Dunbar Spring/John Spring is a neighborhood just north of Downtown Tucson bordered by Speedway to the north, 6th Street to the south, the railroad to the west, and Stone to the east. It was named for 2 important Tucson residents: John Spring, who was one of Tucson’s first teachers and Paul Lawrence Dunbar, who was a renowned African-American poet. The neighborhood was built between 1896 and 1930, on land that once was a cemetery. It was established as the first predominantly African-American neighborhood and was the location of Dunbar School, which was Tucson’s segregated elementary school. The school was later re-named John Spring Junior High School, after desegregation. Some of the architectural styles in Dunbar Spring are Bungalow, Territorial, and Victorian. Search homes for sale in Dunbar Spring neighborhood

Historic El Encanto Condominiums for sale in Tucson

El Encanto Condominiums – Built in 1942, this complex was originally designed to be Tucson’s first luxury apartment complex for winter visitors. El Encanto Condominiums is located conveniently on 6th Street near Country Club, within close proximity to the University of Arizona. Designed by Phoenix architect Orville Bell with local architect Arthur Brown supervising construction, this is one of few examples of Monterrey style architecture in Tucson. The property was purchased in 1962 by a group of investors who re-developed the complex into condominiums. This condo conversion required adding on additional bedrooms and/or bathrooms to most of the units, as well as constructing several new buildings. The new structures followed the design closely and are hard to distinguish from the original buildings. The property features multiple courtyards, gardens, and a pool. Search home for sale in El Encanto Condominiums

Homes for sale in El Encanto Estates neighborhood

El Encanto Estates is a beautiful historic neighborhood, established in 1928 and located in midtown Tucson, near Broadway and Country Club. When established, the location took advantage of the neighboring El Conquistador Hotel (which was torn down in the 1960s to make way for the now defunct El Con Mall). Most homes were built between 1929 and 1961.The neighborhood was entered into the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. Some of the most unique things about the neighborhood is the formal symmetry of the spoke-shaped streets, the palm tree-lined roads, the large yards with impeccable landscaping, and the common area in the center of the neighborhood. The street names were chosen in a contest which requested Spanish names and their English translations, the winners were awarded $5 per winning entry. Click here to read more about El Encanto Estates. Search homes for sale in El Encanto Estates

Homes for sale in Historic El Montevideo neighborhood in Tucson

El Montevideo is a surprisingly semi-rural feeling neighborhood bordered by Broadway Boulevard, 5th Street, Alvernon Way, and Dodge. It is just north of Reid Park and east of El Con shopping center. The neighborhood was founded in 1930 with most homes built by 1961. The neighborhood features homes designed by many notable Tucson architects such as: Josias Joesler, Arthur Brown, William Wilde, Lew Place, and James Gresham. The styles range from Southwestern Revivals to Territorial, to Ranch, and Modern.

El Presidio historic district homes for saleEl Presidio – This neighborhood was the first Tucson neighborhood to be listed on the National Register of Historic Districts. El Presidio (the Spanish name for fort) is the oldest part of the city in the heart of downtown Tucson. Roughly bounded by 6th Street, Church, Alameda, and Granada. Some homes were designed by prominent architects Holmes and Holmes and Henry Trost. The styles ranging from Sonoran Row houses to Bungalow, Territorial, and Mission Revival. Many early prominent Tucson families lived here including the Steinfelds, the Jacomes, Sam Hughes, and J. Knox Corbett. Search homes for sale in El Presidio neighborhood

Feldman's historic district neighborhood in Tucson

Feldman’s – Bounded by Speedway Boulevard to the south, Lee Street to the north, 7th Avenue to the west, and Park Avenue to the east, Feldman’s neighborhood was named after Alther Feldman who was an Eastern-European immigrant who moved to the US in 1958, eventually moving to Tucson in 1878 . Feldman built his home near 1st Avenue and Speedway Boulevard (Speedway was once known as Feldman Street). The Feldman’s neighborhood was founded in 1901 with much of the building occurring in the 1920s. The neighborhood is laid out in a rectangular grid pattern. Most homes are in the Bungalow, Spanish Colonial, or Ranch styles. By 1920, five tuberculosis sanatoriums were located in or near the Feldman’s district (Tuberculosis was once a popular reason to move to Tucson), one sanatorium was converted to an assisted living residence. Search homes for sale in Feldman’s neighborhood

Homes for sale in Fort Lowell Historic District Tucson

Fort Lowell – was originally named Camp Lowell after Brigadier General Charles Russell Lowell, Jr. of Massachusetts who was killed at Cedar Creek, Virginia in 1862. In 1873, the Camp moved about 7 miles northeast from Tucson to the area that is now near Craycroft and Fort Lowell Road. Fort Lowell was used primarily as a supply depot and served as protection from the Apaches, before being shut down in 1891 after its use was no longer needed. The adobe buildings were constructed around a rectangular parade ground. Some of the ruins can be seen today at Fort Lowell Park as well as on the west side of Craycroft Road. Prior to this period, the area had been inhabited by Hohokam people around 300 AD – 1400s. In the early 1900s, families from Sonora Mexico started moving to the area that they called “El Fuerte”. They initially moved into the abandoned fort buildings, but soon started building their own adobe buildings, including the San Pedro Chapel. The original chapel was destroyed in a tornado, but a new chapel was built on the site in 1932. The historic houses within the district are Sonoran style, while many of the newer non-historic houses are contemporary, but built using similar materials. People are drawn to the area by the Rillito River (which is dry except after a substantial rain) as well as the wildlife and mesquite bosques here. Search homes for sale in Fort Lowell historic neighborhood

Harold Bell Wright Estates homes for sale in Tucson

Harold Bell Wright Estates located near Speedway Boulevard and Wilmot Road in Tucson, was named after a prolific early-20th century fiction author. Harold Bell Wright wrote 19 novels between 1903 – 1942. He is said to be the first American fiction author to sell over 1 million copies. 21 movies were based on his stories including The Shepherd of the Hills (made into a film starring John Wayne), and The Winning of Barbara Worth (one of Gary Cooper’s first films). Wright suffered from tuberculosis and came to Tucson for his health, as so many people did back then. After living near the downtown area, he purchased a 160-acre parcel of land near Speedway & Wilmot in 1920.  Wright liked the desert and wanted to get away from the city. After extensive planning, his home was finished in 1922. Wright moved to California in 1935 and sold his Tucson estate in 1936. Wright passed away in 1944 in California. In 1950, the land was subdivided and turned into the Harold Bell Wright Estates. The land was divided into approximately 1/2 acre parcels and the streets were named after his books. The neighborhood is known for it’s large yards featuring desert landscaping. A community park is tucked away in a corner of the neighborhood with playground equipment and lots of grassy area to throw a Frisbee or kick a ball around. Click here to read more about the Harold Bell Wright Estates neighborhood. Search homes for sale in Harold Bell Wright Estates

Indian House neighborhood

Indian House is a small neighborhood consisting of only 11 properties on large rural lots ranging from 1 to 6 acres each. The neighborhood was once on the outskirts of Tucson but is now a rural oasis in the middle of the city. Located near 5th Street and Wilmot Road on an unpaved road, each home was built in the Pueblo Revival or Territorial Revival styles. The land was purchased in 1926 by Charles Morgan and Nan Wood who intended to make Arizona their full-time home after a few winters spent here. After Charles’ sudden passing, Nan hired Santa Fe architect William P. Henderson to build her desert home in 1929. The land was sold to May S. Carr in 1949, who subdivided the property and put in place the deed restrictions which helped maintain the original character of the neighborhood. Some of the other homes were designed by Tucson architects Starkweather & Morse, and Gordon Luepke (who worked closely with Josias Joesler on several other projects). Search homes for sale in Indian House neighborhood

Indian Ridge Estates Tucson Historic neighborhoodIndian Ridge Developed and built by the Lusk Corporation, this neighborhood includes Indian Crest Estates (1956) and Indian Ridge Terrace (1957). It is located on Tucson’s northeast side near Tanque Verde Road and Sabino Canyon Road in an area bordering ancient Indian ruins. The neighborhood is known for the angular, single-story, low-slung ranch homes with asymmetrical pitched roofs, using uniquely southwestern materials such as burnt adobe and red brick. Large angled windows and sliding glass doors are ubiquitous in the neighborhood. Indian Ridge won the coveted Merit Award from the National Association of Home Builders in 1957 and was entered into the National Register of Historic Districts in 2010. Click here to read more about Indian Ridge Estates.  Search home for sale in Indian Ridge Estates

Iron Horse neighborhood homes for sale

Iron Horse – The name of this neighborhood references the steam locomotive that became a familiar sight when the Southern Pacific Railroad (SPRR) arrived in Tucson in 1880. This neighborhood, just east of 4th Avenue and between 8th and 10th Streets, was established in the 1880s and continued being built out into the 1920s. Styles of homes include Sonoran, Territorial, Queen Anne, Bungalow, Spanish Revival, and Mission Revival. It’s the only neighborhood in Tucson that was primarily developed for rental use and also consists of all these architectural styles. Many were duplexes or single family homes with an extra boarding room attached. Naturally, the neighborhood is distinctive because of the higher density and smaller lots. The SPRR required employees to live within 1 mile of the tracks so they’d be able to hear the whistle codes, before the time of telephones. In 1910, 60% of the inhabitants of Iron Horse were railroad employees. Search homes for sale in Iron Horse

Homes for sale in historic Jefferson Park neighborhood, Tucson

Jefferson Park – Consists of parts of 5 subdivisions that were originally filed between 1905 and 1945. This popular neighborhood is only a half mile north of the University of Arizona. It is bounded by Grant to the north, Lester to the south, Campbell to the east, and Euclid to the west. The land was homesteaded in 1898 by Annie Stattelman Lester. The neighborhood started out as an informal rural community with no restrictions on home construction, lot size, or resident’s race (as was the norm at the time). Bungalow, Spanish Colonial Revival, Pueblo Revival, Southwest, and Post-WWII Ranch style homes can all be seen here. The bulk of the homes in Jefferson Park were constructed after WWII and many were built of red brick. The neighborhood is unique because it is a rare surviving example of a rural subdivision that was slowly built up over a 60-year period, one house at a time. The neighborhood has an active, voluntary homeowner’s association. Search homes for sale in Jefferson Park neighborhood

Homes for sale in Menlo Park

Menlo Park – This west-side neighborhood is set in the shadow of “A” Mountain (Sentinel Peak), just west of I-10, downtown Tucson, and the Santa Cruz River. Platted in 1913, it was the first major subdivision west of downtown that was within city limits. The historic district has irregular borders, but is roughly between I-10 and Silverbell, both north and south of Congress Street. Menlo Park was named by Henry Schwalen after the community in California, a town he never visited but read about that sounded ideal to him. The oldest home in Menlo Park was built in 1877, but homes continued to be built after WWII. Most residences are single family, but there are some duplexes and triplexes as well. The styles of the homes in Menlo Park are mostly Bungalow, Spanish Colonial Revival, Transitional Ranch, Ranch, Modern, and Vernacular. Waist-high fences that enclose the front yards are common in Menlo Park. The Mercado San Agustin and streetcar stop are popular draws to the area. Tumamoc Hill and the bike path at the Santa Cruz are both popular recreation areas nearby. Search homes for sale in Menlo Park

Homes for sale in Pie Allen neighborhood

Pie Allen – Named after John Brackett “Pie” Allen (1818-1899) who served as Tucson’s Mayor from 1875-1877. Allen also served on the Arizona Territorial Legislature and was appointed to be the Arizona Territorial Treasurer. Allen earned his nickname for the dried apple pies he sold to soldiers and other Territorial settlers for $1. Allen led the effort to move the Territorial Capitol from Prescott to Tucson in 1867. The neighborhood that graces Allen’s name is between Euclid and Park Avenue and between 6th Street and 10th Street, sandwiched between Iron Horse Historic District to the west and Rincon Heights Historic District to the east. Pie Allen is similar to it’s bordering neighborhood, Iron Horse, as it was designed and built for tenants to live and housed many early railroad workers. Search homes for sale in Pie Allen neighborhood

Rincon Heights homes for sale

Rincon Heights – Just south of the University of Arizona is Rincon Heights Historic District. It is bounded by 6th Street, Broadway, Fremont, and Campbell. The long build out from 1881-1970 means that many styles of homes are represented. Spanish Colonial Revival, Pueblo Revival, Bungalow, Craftsman, and Ranch can be seen here. The lack of deed restrictions enabled Rincon Heights to be more affordable, thus attracting lower-middle to middle class residents to the modest sized houses. The neighborhood is now popular with University of Arizona students, due to it’s close proximity to the campus. The neighborhood gained historic district status in 2013. Search homes for sale in Rincon Heights neighborhood

Sam Hughes Historic District homes for saleSam Hughes is bounded by Speedway, Broadway, Campbell, and Country Club. Sam Hughes is named for the Tucson merchant who arrived here in the 1860s. Hughes helped incorporate the City of Tucson and he assisted in establishing public education here. Sam Hughes Elementary School was named after Hughes first, later the neighborhood surrounding the school adopted the name. Most homes in the neighborhood were built in the 1920s through the 1950s. The architectural styles in the neighborhood are very eclectic, varying  from California Bungalow to Pueblo Revival to Mission Revival to Craftsman styles. Many like Sam Hughes because of it’s proximity to the University of Arizona directly to the west. Himmel Park, a large city park featuring a small public library is also a popular feature of the neighborhood. Search homes for sale in Sam Hughes neighborhood

Homes for sale in Historic San Clemente neighborhood Tucson AZ

San Clemente – This neighborhood, which was named to evoke an image of the California town of the same name, received Historic District status in 2005. The boundaries are Broadway to the north, Timrod to the south, Alvernon to the west, and Columbus to the east. The neighborhood was platted in sections between 1923-1946 with homes being built between 1930-1960. The more northern parts of the neighborhood are curvilinear, reminiscent of nearby Colonia Solana and El Encanto neighborhoods. The other section of the neighborhood is laid out in a grid to maximize the land usage. Most homes were designed in one of six ranch styles with a few revival homes in the mix. This neighborhood also features 2 apartment complexes that were built in 1949. Randolph House is one of these apartment buildings that features beautiful landscaped grounds. San Clemente was home to notable residents like Evo And Ora DeConcini (parents of former Arizona senator Dennis DeConcini) and Tucson architect Bernard Friedman. This neighborhood continues to be popular due to it’s close proximity to El Con, Reid Park, Broadway Village, and the University of Arizona campus. Search homes for sale in San Clemente neighborhood

San Rafael Estates neighborhood in TucsonSan Rafael Estates – This neighborhood, developed by the Lusk Corporation, is located near Broadway and Wilmot on Tucson’s east side. This small neighborhood with 69 ranch style homes and a community pool consists of 3 floor plans: the ‘Lanai’, the ‘Monterrey’, and the ‘Homes for all America’. Each of these models had several elevations and materials/colors to choose from which made each home unique. Burnt Adobe was the main building material for the neighborhood. This project won the prestigious Merit Award from the National Association of Home Builders. San Rafael Estates was entered into the National Register of Historic Neighborhoods in 2013. Click here to read more about San Rafael Estates neighborhood. Search homes for sale in San Rafael Estates

Villa Catalina Historic District homes for saleVilla Catalina is one of the most recognizable communities in Tucson. It’s a wonderful example of mid-century modern architecture with its broad linear roof line and the unique square & circle shaped railings.  The units were constructed between 1957 – 1960 at 6th Street and Country Club. The development was designed for patio apartment living, which was popular in the post-war era and was described as ‘Tucson’s first own your own apartment homes’.  The developer, Lionel Mayell, built similar communities in other parts of Arizona, California, and Texas. In 1992, Villa Catalina was converted to a 55 + community. The community was recently listed on the National Registrar of Historic Places in December 2009. Click here to read more about Villa Catalina.  Search homes for sale in Villa Catalina

West University Historic District in TucsonWest University– was developed in the late 1800s to the early 1900s and became the first major subdivision north of the Southern Pacific Railroad. The location of West University neighborhood was convenient to both the railroad that arrived in 1880 and the University of Arizona, which opened in 1891. It developed into an area of town that attracted many community leaders in Tucson, including local politicians, store owners, educators, and architects. The Ronstadts and the Drachmans were notable residents. During the territorial period (before statehood in 1912) there was quite a bit of building and land speculation which was stimulated by the development of the streetcar that opened in 1897, connecting the downtown area with the University of Arizona (sound familiar?). The neighborhood is known for Bungalow style homes, about 50% are of this style. Many architects worked in West University, but Henry O. Jaastad (who also became Tucson’s mayor) was the most prolific archtect, designing about 5o of the area’s buildings. West University is a very walk-able neighborhood, having 2 major shopping/restaurant districts nearby: 4th Avenue and Main Gate Square. It also has a nice central community space in Catalina Park, a compact, grassy, tree-shaded block that has a wading pool and a children’s play area. The streetcar passes right through the neighborhood making it convenient for heading to the University of Arizona or downtown in short time. Click here to read more about West University neighborhood. Search homes for sale in West University

Winterhaven homes for saleWinterhaven is a popular central Tucson neighborhood that was established in 1949 and is known primarily for the annual Festival of Lights when 60,000 visitors walk, bike, or drive through the neighborhood after dark. The Festival of Lights event lasts 2 weeks each year in December. The neighborhood is bounded between Prince (to the north), Fort Lowell (to the south), Tucson Boulevard (to the west), and Country Club (to the east). It is known for its ranch style homes, large pine trees, and rare Tucson lawns. Winterhaven was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 28, 2005. Click here to read more about the Winterhaven neighborhood. Search homes for sale in Winterhaven

The major advantage to having a qualifying home in a historic districts is the property tax breaks. Many people like the unique characteristics of historic homes and the established neighborhoods that surround them. Historic districts also tend to be located in popular, central locations close to many amenities.

General information on National Register of Historic Places

These 5 factors are used to determine if a property qualifies for the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP):

  • Properties must be 50 years or older.
  • The property must have maintained most of its original integrity.
  • Has the property been associated with a historic event or activity, or important historical person?
  • Does the property have distinctive design or character?
  • Does the property provide information about historic events?

Each contributing NRHP district must maintain enough of its original qualities, such as location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, and feeling to visibly convey its significance. The National Register Historic District must contain a minimum of 51% contributing properties within its boundaries.

What are the advantages for NRHP listed properties?

  • There could be a significant savings in property taxes
  • provides formal recognition of a property’s historical, architectural, or archeological significance
  • The property becomes part of the National Register Archives
  • It encourages historic preservation

Are you interested in historic homes in Tucson? Or would you like to sell your historic property? Contact Nick at 520-975-8956 or Nick@RealTucson.com

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Map of neighborhoods around Downtown Tucson

 

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Homes for sale in Wilshire Heights neighborhood Tucson

Wilshire Heights neighborhood was developed by Chesin Construction Company just southeast of Broadway and Craycroft. The neighborhood, built in the 1950s-1960s, is known for it’s broad ranch style homes situated on large lots with curved streets that wrap around a grassy neighborhood park. Most houses are 1800 sf – 3000 sf in size on typically 1/4 – 1/2 acre lots. The neighborhood is convenient to Williams Centre, Park Place Mall, Tucson Medical Center, and Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (DMAFB), with plenty of restaurants and shops close by. The neighborhood is within the Tucson Unified School District and is served by Kellond Elementary, Vail Middle, and Rincon High schools.

Mid Century Ranch home in Wilshire Heights neighborhood Tucson


Wilshire Heights - Worth waiting for 1948 ad

Edward Chesin started Chesin Construction Company in Tucson. Chesin was born in Phildelphia, lived in Detroit and Chicago, before moving his family to Tucson in 1947. He began building in 1949. He built tract homes, custom homes, and commercial projects in the Tucson area. Chesin was familiar with Tucson through his flight training at DMAFB years before. He never forgot his flying days in WWII and he opened up the Flying Tiger Bar in 1969 on Golf Links Road, which was filled with Flying Tiger memorabilia. His companies built over 5,000 homes in the Tucson area. Chesin built his family’s own home in Wilshire Heights. Tucson’s Chesin Drive was named for his family and Marc Drive was named for his son. Edward Chesin died in 1995. Wilshire Heights 1954 open house ad

Wilshire Heights was a custom home community where some homes were advertised as having refrigeration and maid’s quarters. Noted Tucson Architects William Wilde and Arthur Brown reportedly designed homes here.

Interested in learning more about mid-century homes in the Tucson area? Check out my Tucson mid-century home guide!

houses available in Wilshire Heights neighborhood Tucson

Wilshire Heights - 1954 newspaper advertisement

Example of home in Wilshire Heights neighborhood in Tucson

Interested in buying or selling a home in Wilshire Heights? Nick can help you! Contact him at 520-975-8956 or Nick@RealTucson.com

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Bungalow homes for sale in Tucson

 

Bungalow style home in West University, Tucson

If you pass by most older Tucson neighborhoods, chances are you’ll see several Bungalow homes. Maybe, like me, you’ve always been fascinated by these charming houses.

The term Bungalow originated from India. Sometimes called Craftsman or California Bungalow, these homes were popular in the early 20th century in many parts of the country, including Tucson. Part of their popularity was their simple design and ease of construction. The simplicity was a welcome departure from the fussy, complicated Victorian era homes.  Sears and other companies sold bungalow kits, which made these homes more accessible to the masses. The broad porches and wide eaves were a great way to deal with the hot summers before air conditioning.

What are some defining characteristics of Bungalows?

  • Usually single story
  • Large, often tapered, supports holding up a wide front porch
  • Gable roof
  • House is 3-4 steps above grade
  • Double-hung windows
  • Wide eaves
  • Built-in cabinetry Search for Bungalow style house in Tucson

Bungalows can be found in many neighborhoods, including:

Interested in buying or selling a Bungalow in Tucson? Nick can help you! Contact him at 520-975-8956 or Nick@RealTucson.com

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Windsor Park neighborhood in Tucson. Homes for sale

Windsor Park is a small community of roughly 125 mid-century modern homes on Tucson’s northeast side. Windsor Park was developed in 1962 by J. Herbert Oxman, with homes designed by David Swanson from the Tucson architecture firm Ambrose and Swanson. Oxman came to Arizona from New York in 1961 and started building in Tucson in 1962. In 1963 he won the “Best Home for the Money” award from American Home Magazine. Architect David Swanson moved to Tucson in 1950 after earning an architecture degree from University of Oregon.

Windsor Park II ad

Built in 3 phases with models named Camelot, Manchester, Presidio, Carmel, Taos, and Balboa, Windsor Park was advertised as ‘almost living outdoors’ with more than ‘575 sq. ft. of glass’ in a 3-bedroom home. Windsor Park homes were constructed of either Burnt Adobe or “Windsor stone”, in a decidedly mid-century modern flair with large expanses of windows in most rooms. They featured 3-4 bedrooms, double carports or garages, and wide, low-slung angled roofs on large lots (most lots range in size from about 1/4 acre to 1/3 acre). The streets in Windsor Park were planned with several cul-de-sacs to ensure a quiet neighborhood environment. Windsor Park falls within the TUSD school district. Henry Elementary, Magee Middle, and Sahuaro High are the schools for this area.

Windsor Park II advertisementHomes for sale in Windsor Park neighborhood TucsonJ. Herbert Oxman later developed other Tucson neighborhoods on the east and northeast sides of town such as: El Dorado Hills, Tanque Verde Estates, Cresta Verde, Verde Vista, and Cheyenne Estates.

Interested in learning more about mid-century homes in Tucson? Check out my mid-century Tucson neighborhood guide here!

Windsor Park a Tucson neighborhood with a Mid Century Modern flair

Are you interested in homes for sale in Windsor Park? Or do you have a home in Windsor Park that you’d like to sell? Contact Nick to schedule an appointment to see how Nick can help you. 520-975-8956   Nick@RealTucson.com

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Windsor Park U-shaped kitchens advertisement

 

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West University Historic District Neighborhood

Tucson Streetcar at Time Market in West University neighborhood

West University Neighborhood is a National Historic District bounded by Speedway Blvd., Park Ave., 6th St., and Stone Ave. It was developed in the late 1800s to the early 1900s and became the first major subdivision north of the Southern Pacific Railroad. The location of West University neighborhood was convenient to both the railroad that arrived in 1880 and the University of Arizona, which opened in 1891. It developed into an area of town that attracted many community leaders in Tucson, including local politicians, store owners, educators, and architects. The Ronstadt’s and the Drachman’s were notable residents. During the territorial period (before 1912) there was quite a bit of building and land speculation which was stimulated by the development of the streetcar that opened in 1897, connecting the downtown area with the University of Arizona (sound familiar?).


Bungalow style homes make up about half of the neighborhood. Some other styles represented are Craftsman, Prairie, Mission Revival, Gothic Revival, Art Deco, Neo-Classical. Many of the homes used Basalt stone from nearby A-Mountain (Sentinel Peak). Prominent architects who worked in the neighborhood include Henry Trost, Roy Place, David Holmes, Henry Jaastad, Annie Graham Rockfellow, John Murphey and, Merritt Starkweather.

Ronstadt House 1904 Trost and Rust

Henry Jaastad, who later became Tucson’s mayor, was the most prolific architect in the neighborhood, credited with designing 50 homes in West University as well as the YWCA and 5 churches. Jaastad got his start working as a carpenter for Trost & Trost. After completing a correspondence course in architecture, he opened his own firm in 1908. He hired Annie Graham Rockfellow as his lead designer in 1916. Rockfellow was the first woman architect registered in Arizona and is credited with designing the El Conquistador Hotel which she considered her greatest achievement.

Annie Rockfellow designed home in West University

Roy Place is the architect who worked on 2 dozen University of Arizona buildings, as well as some homes in West University.  Place’s most well known building is the Pima County Courthouse. Henry Trost, who was influenced by Louis Sullivan, was the architect who worked on the Ronstadt house located on 6th Avenue.

West University is very walk-able having 2 major shopping/restaurant districts nearby: 4th Avenue and Main Gate. It also has a nice central community space in Catalina Park, a grassy, tree-shaded block that has a wading pool and a children’s play area. The streetcar passes right through the neighborhood making it convenient for heading to the University of Arizona or downtown in short time. The neighborhood falls within the TUSD school district with Roskruge Elementary, Mansfeld Middle, and Tucson High being the schools for the area.

Catalina Park in West University neighborhood, Tucson, Arizona

The neighborhood first gained entry to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. Parts of the neighborhood are also included in the “West University Historic Preservation Zone” which has stricter guidelines for any modifications on the exterior of the buildings.

Are you interested in homes for sale in the West University neighborhood? Or you’d like to sell your home in West University? Contact Nick at 520-975-8956 or Nick@RealTucson.com

Sign up to receive daily email updates on homes as they go on the market.

Or download the new Long Realty app now:  iPad iPhone Android

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  • Current and Accurate – Information updated every 15 minutes from the MLS
  • Find nearby properties
  • Draw your own search area
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  • Large, high resolution property photos
  • HomeScan – Scan the neighborhood for homes using a live camera view

West University Map Tucson

Home in West University

Detail of Sullivanesque column of a Hentry Trost home in West University, Tucson, Arizona 1905

art deco facade addition by Henry Jaastad in 1934

building in West University, Tucson

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